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acetech

Hey everyone,

I' am living in the chicagoland area, IL, and am looking for some people to put together a team with the goal of developing a hydrogen furnace capable of heating a residential dwelling. I am in need of some partners knowledgeable in the production, storage, and combustion of hydrogen.

as for myself, I am very knowledgeable in the HVAC industry, and currently service all makes and models of furnaces, a/c units, refrigeration equipment, and just about anything relating to this field. I would like to put a team together to design, build and test a prototype.

anyone interested?
paul h
acetech,
>am looking for some people to put together a team with the goal of developing a hydrogen furnace capable of heating a residential dwelling.

Gee, are you hoping that the hydrogen will be piped into everyone's home like LP gas is now? The main reason that there are few hydrogen powered devices is that there is no real supply. You could convert the LP into hydrogen on site, then use it to produce electricity which could then be used to heat the home. but there is that small problem of waste byproducts.
thunder8
Wouldn't be easier to heat your home with electricity. The electrical supply system is already set up. It also easier to maintain.
BigDumbWeirdo
Why hydrogen?
Why not LP?
Or electrical?
Or even wood burning?
paul h
QUOTE (thunder8+Mar 29 2008, 12:29 PM)
Wouldn't be easier to heat your home with electricity. The electrical supply system is already set up. It also easier to maintain.

You hit the nail right on the head here.
Enthalpy
What if, instead of a furnace, you produce electricity in a fuel cell and use the waste heat to heat the home? This makes a better use of the hydrogen and some companies already market it with success - you could add your own company.

The best known fuel cell supplier is Ballard, not far away from Chicago.

If you really want to simply burn the hydrogen (pity), you may prefer a catalyst to a flame. No risk of leak without combustion. Lower temperature, reducing the risk of homefire. But pay attention to the poisoning of the catalyst by air dirt.
acetech
enthalpy,

your on the right track.
your the kind of people we need to help get this off the ground.

ace
paul h
http://www.acumentrics.com/products-fuel-c...home-energy.htm

I found this. it is along the line that I was speaking of in my above post.
I see that they did put a scrubber on it to prevent sulfur and nitric oxide
jnpope
Whatever happened to this thread? It seems to me that the hydrogen furnace would be a great place to begin when looking to make home energy less dependent upon the fossil fuel industry.

I started by looking at using hydrogen - HHO technology - to power a car, and I found that cars were run on hydrogen in the early 1800s, long before gasoline was discovered. There were good reasons why that failed to take hold, given the volatility of hydrogen and the difficulty in storing it. But with the advent of HHO technology, hydrogen can be produced and burned "on the fly", so to speak.

AS I reviewed the info on HHO for cars, I ran across a "design" for a furnace gun that would burn HHO in a household furnace. Unfortunately, the design was more of a theoretical than a practical nature, but it seemed about as simple to build as an HHO torch, which has been around for years!

Rather than ridicule the idea of heating households with Hydrogen, I would like to see it discussed seriously from the perspective of generating the hydrogen from water as it is required by the home heating unit, such as the furnace - HHO technology seems to me to be a practical way of doing it. Even combining fuel cells, furnaces and HHO technology has great potential!

While the HHO technology seems to have very few proponents, neither does it appear to have numbers of ardent enemies and the high mortality rates of some other techniques to get extremely high gas mileage in cars. There are techniques, for instance, that have gotten nearly 100 mpg in an old (1960s vintage) V8 station wagon, but everyone who attempted to put it into production died mysteriously. When the son of a coworker wanted to get a prototype produced, he could find NO takers! All told him that they didn't want to die!

So greed is definitely a player in the lack of development of new ideas - especially those ideas that can't be "captured" and monopolized, but this thread seems to have died a death from lack of knowledge and foresight.

DID this thread move elsewhere? If so, where? If not, is anyone still interested in it?

JNPope
wtrpwrcorpmike
built and am using hydrogen heater in home. please see youtube hydrogen heater residential use a. will be posting new video in couple weeks. unit running for 18 months . this unit is a model t but represents pros and cons of hydrogen,am looking to build an overunity generator in oct to privide electricity to power heater
asiaview
Yeah, like paul said You could convert the LP into hydrogen on site
However i don't do that smile.gif
Beer w/Straw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FROxZ5i67k
JC
Wouldn't be easier to heat your home with electricity. The electrical supply system is already set up. It also easier to maintain.

The furnace that is set up in my home burns natural gas..it's a forced air system.
My parents used to have forced air but switch to baseboard heating (water) and set the house up into zones. Water holds heat longer than air and releases it more slowly. Combine that with zone heating so that you get a more even heat throughout the house (and the delivery to the baseboards seems to occur less often) and you get a more efficient design.

You also don't get dust, dirt and other airborne allergens kicked up by air vents.

As for hydrogen. How so? If you're burning it, how is it being produced? Chemical reaction means working with harmful substances or with other fuels such as methane which can be burned directly.
Electrolysis is simply not efficient.
While fuel cells are an efficient way of producing electricity from a fuel, if that fuel is hydrogen you will still need to produce it and the conversion of electricity to hot air (or from electricity to hot water) isn't really any more efficient than simply burning it.


People like the idea of hydrogen. High energy output per unit mass and the waste product is pure water.

But you could say that we live in a hydrogen spent world. It's what? 70% of the Earth's surface is cover by water.

Clean energy isn't just energy that doesn't produce CO2 (and other greenhouse gasses and pollutants), clean energy is the kind that simply doesn't produce a net output.

An example being methane. While drilling for trapped natural gas deposits and using such gas as a fuel would result in a net increase to greenhouse gasses, using organism would not...

Such organisms consume CO2 and water (along with other substances) in the production of methane. We then burn the methane which produces the CO2 and water that was consumed for a net gain of 0.
bowlan
QUOTE (paul h+Mar 29 2008, 04:23 PM)
acetech,
>am looking for some people to put together a team with the goal of developing a hydrogen furnace capable of heating a residential dwelling.

Gee, are you hoping that the hydrogen will be piped into everyone's home like LP gas is now? The main reason that there are few hydrogen powered devices is that there is no real supply. You could convert the LP into hydrogen on site, then use it to produce electricity which could then be used to heat the home. but there is that small problem of waste byproducts.

you would never get it approved for resedential use or sales.
we have already tried
the oil and gas companies hold to big of a grip over the u.s.
globren
Hi All - Newbie to hydrogen furnaces... If I hooked a solar powered hydrogen generator directly to a gas furnace with flashback protection, what problems could I expect?
Capracus
Ideal hydrogen combustion is twice as lean as that of natural gas, so you would have to meter the burner feed accordingly.
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