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sahil
A critically damped system is one in which the system does not oscillate and returns to its equilibrium position without oscillating.

Even, in an overdamped system the system does not oscillate and returns to its equilibrium position without oscillating but at a slower rate compared to a critically damped system.

My questions are:

1) An automatic door close is an example of an overdamped system.Right? I want to know how is this overdamping property achieved in an automatic door closer practically?

2)Can anyone give an example of critically damped system and again tell me how are the characteristics of being critically damped achieved practically?
Please help!!
StevenA
Here's an image from this link: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/oscda2.html

User posted image

A critically damped system doesn't overshoot or ring and the system reaches a stable state fastest.

An underdamped system will cross the target point faster than a critically damped system, but it overshoots and then proceeds to have a decaying oscillation.

An underdamped system is just slower and more damped than a critically damped one.
Zephir
QUOTE (sahil+Nov 17 2006, 08:57 AM)
I want to know how is this overdamping property achieved in an automatic door closer practically?

The automatic door closer is using an oil sealed plunger (piston), i.e. the principle is the same, like at the case of shock-absorber in automobiles.

User posted image user posted image

The example of critical dumping system in oscilloscope, it's being used in LRC circuits for amplifiers and in industrial PID regulators and actuators.
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